April 26, 27, 28 - Minnesota State Fairgrounds
1265 Snelling Ave North, St. Paul, MN

Sponsored by the Minnesota Horse Council
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2019 MN Horse Expo Speakers/Demos
Schedule subject to change

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University of Minnesota Speakers

Friday, April 26

DNR Building
10:00-11:00 - Chuck Clanton
Will Your Building Hold the Load?
Nature was not kind this winter and spring with an overabundance of snow, followed by untimely rain and temperature swings resulting in numerous roof and building collapses. Learn what is needed to keep roofs intact, including truss connections, building codes, reducing risk of material deterioration, diagnosing and troubleshooting aging trusses, terminology used by the building industry, and fire safety.

Swine Barn
10:00-11:00 - Amanda Reiter and Devan Catalano
Hands-on: Bodyweight Estimation and Body Condition Scoring
- Determining a horse’s body weight is important for weight and feeding management and administration of medication. Participants will learn how to use weight tapes, estimation equations, and mobile apps to estimate equine bodyweight. Participants will also learn how to determine equine body condition score. 

DNR Building
Noon-1:00 -
Amanda Reiter
Using Your Hay Supply Efficiently
- Producing horse quality hay has been challenging with the changing climate in recent years. As a result, hay prices have continued to rise and using efficiently has become a top priority for horse owners and managers. This presentation will focus on ways horse managers and owners can apply dynamic practices to conserve their hay supply, including proper harvesting, storage and feeding, while ensuring horse health and safety. 

DNR Building
2:00-3:00 - Devan Catalano
Renovating the Pasture You Have
- Is your pasture run down, over worked, weedy and tired looking? This presentation will focus on improving your pasture by discussing pasture fertility, seeding options, the importance of regrowth, weed control, rotational grazing, and other important best management practices so your pasture can thrive and produce bountiful forage for your horses.

DNR Building
4:00 - 5:00 - Nicky Overgaard, Devon Catalano, Nathan O’Connor
Educating the Future of the Horse Industry Round Table

 

Saturday, April 26

DNR Building

9:00-10:00 - Abby Neu

Economically Feeding the Backyard Horse
- This presentation will focus on feeding recreational horses on a budget, including a discussion on estimating horse bodyweight and body condition, weighing feed, maximizing forage and pasture, and use of rational balancers. Tips on adjusting diets for easy and hard keepers and managing horses in herds will also be covered.

DNR Building
11:00-Noon - Krishona Martinson
Renovating the Pasture You Have
- Is your pasture run down, over worked, weedy and tired looking? This presentation will focus on improving your pasture by discussing pasture fertility, seeding options, the importance of regrowth, weed control, rotational grazing, and other important best management practices so your pasture can thrive and produce bountiful forage for your horses.

Swine Barn
1:00-2:00  Krishona Martinson and Abby Neu
Hands-on: bodyweight estimation and body condition scoring
- Determining a horse’s body weight is important for weight and feeding management and administration of medication. Participants will learn how to use weight tapes, estimation equations, and mobile apps to estimate equine bodyweight. Participants will also learn how to determine equine body condition score.

DNR Building
2:00-3:00
- Lauren Hughes, DVM
A Look at the Equine Eye: Common Problems -
Problems affecting the equine eye are common and the ability to recognize them and involve your veterinarian in treatment can drastically increase the prognosis and outcome of these conditions. Come learn about equine ocular anatomy, the components of the exam and many common conditions that affect the equine eye. 

DNR Building
5:00-6:00 - Nicky Overgaard, Nathan O’Connor, Krishona Martinson
Educating the Future of the Horse Industry Round Table

 

Sunday, April 28

DNR Building
10:00-11:00 -
Dr. Fausto Bellezzo
Wounds: Do’s and Don’ts -
This presentation will introduce the phases of healing, followed by a series of photographs showing different types of wounds at different locations on the horse. Talk will center around wound assessment and what constitutes good or bad decisions based on said assessment.

DNR Building
Noon-1:00- Aubrey Jaqueth

Horse Weight Carry Capacity
- Have you ever wondered if there is an ideal weight range for a horse to carry when being ridden? This presentation will discuss research focused on how to determine the ideal weight carrying capacity of your horse and other factors to take into consideration which may change this number.

DNR Building
4:00-5:00 - Marcia Hathaway
Economically Feeding the Backyard Horse
- This presentation will focus on feeding recreational horses on a budget, including a discussion on estimating horse bodyweight and body condition, weighing feed, maximizing forage and pasture, and use of rational balancers. Tips on adjusting diets for easy and hard keepers and managing horses in herds will also be covered.
 

 

 


 


Devan Catalano, M.S., University of Minnesota

Devan Catalano earned a BS in equine science from Colorado State University and an MS in animal science from the University of Minnesota. She is currently working on her PhD in animal science at the University of Minnesota, where she is specializing in equine nutrition and management. Her research focuses on grazing different forages and creating equine bodyweight prediction equations. In her free time, Devan enjoys riding her appaloosa gelding, Tio, and hiking with her dog, Casey.




 


Chuck Clanton
has been one of the Bioproducts and Biosystems Engineers at the UMN for 39 years. He has degrees in Agricultural Engineering and Animal Science from the Universities of Nebraska and Minnesota. Chuck’s area of expertise is livestock housing and environmental issues of air and water (surface and ground) quality associated with animals. He is also a licensed Professional Engineer.

 



 


Marcia Hathaway, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Marcia Hathaway earned a B.S., and M.S. in Animal Nutrition from the Ohio State University and a Ph. D. in Animal Nutrition from the University of Minnesota. She is a Professor at the University of Minnesota where she teaches equine nutrition to undergraduates and conducts research on equine skeletal muscle.
 



 


Krishona Martinson, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Krishona Martinson is the Equine Extension Specialist at the University of Minnesota and holds a BS, MS and PhD in Agronomy.  Her research specializes in optimizing equine forage utilization in both pasture and hay systems.  Along with her daughters, Dr. Martinson competes locally in WSCA speed events with her Quarter Horse mare Braker.
 


Aubrey Jaqueth, Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Aubrey Jaqueth is a Postdoctoral Research Assistant in the Department of Animal Science at the University of Minnesota. She recently obtained her Ph.D. in Animal Science from the University of Maryland where she studied novel uses for turf grasses on horse farms. While in Minnesota, she has taken part in a wide range of research projects including grazing cover crops and alfalfa production. When not working, Aubrey can be found at the barn with her horse, Donny.



 


Abby Neu, M.S., University of Minnesota

Abby Neu has a BS in Ag Industries and Marketing and a MS in Animal Science from the University of Minnesota. She worked in the horse and agriculture industries 11 years prior to joining University of Minnesota Extension in 2013.  Her professional interests include poultry and livestock biosecurity, non-ruminant nutrition, pasture management, farm emergency preparedness and programming for women in agriculture. Abby has enjoyed training and showing her horses to more than twenty national and world championships.  At home, she answers to a Jack Russell terrier and four retired show horses.



Amanda Reiter, M.S., University of Minnesota

Amanda Reiter is from Walker, Minnesota and recently graduated from the University of Minnesota with a Bachelor’s degree in Animal Science with an Equine Emphasis. Amanda recently started her M.S. program where her research focuses on the efficiency and feed waste associated with different round bale wrap types and muscle biology focused on equine satellite cells. When she is not in the field or the lab, Amanda enjoys riding her Friesian Sport Horse, Aldrick. 


 



Lauren Hughes, DVM

A Look at the Equine Eye: Common Problems

Problems affecting the equine eye are common and the ability to recognize them and involve your veterinarian in treatment can drastically increase the prognosis and outcome of these conditions. Come learn about equine ocular anatomy, the components of the exam and many common conditions that affect the equine eye. This presentation focuses on how to recognize these conditions, a review of diagnostic and treatment options, and discussion of prognosis.

Dr. Lauren Hughes grew up in northern Wisconsin with a strong interest in horses where she participated in the local hunter jumper circuit. This passion for horses led her to pursue a bachelors degree in Animal Science from the University of Wisconsin-River Falls. She attended veterinary school at Iowa State University and completed a one- year internship at New England Equine Medical & Surgical Center in Dover, New Hampshire. She is currently completing a three-year residency in Large Animal Internal Medicine at the University of Minnesota and enjoys getting to work with the Minnesota horse community on a daily basis. Her professional interests include neonatal medicine, ophthalmology, endocrine disease and research in equine genetics.
 



 


Dr. Fausto Bellezzo
Dr. Bellezzo decided to be a veterinarian at the age of fourteen and got into vet school in Brazil at the age of eighteen. He worked there for several years, four of them at the race track in Sao Paulo as a regulatory veterinarian. After coming to the USA for a visit, Dr. Bellezzo became fascinated with the work that was being done here. He did 3 internships (one in Kentucky), a surgery residency at Tufts University, and worked at Colorado State University as a surgeon and a critical care fellow for a about nine years before coming to Minnesota. He has been at the Leatherdale Equine Center since October 2016.
 His favorite cases include surgical colics, trauma/ lacerations, urogenital surgeries and soft tissue masses, but he sees pretty much everything.

 



 
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